Posted by: tootingtrumpet | October 11, 2010

India vs Australia – Second Test Day Three

 

 

 

The final over of the day.

Ball One – Ben Hilfenhaus, much the best of Australia’s bowlers, brings one back into Murali Vijay and traps him plumb in front, but his appeal is turned down by Gunner Gould. It looked out at first view, on replay and on Hawkeye. This is Gunner and Billy’s eighth day in the middle in the last eleven. Back to back Tests are demanding for players, but it’s only the umpires who are in the sun (and the spotlight) all day, every day.

Ball Two – Less than half way through the Test, the bookies have written it off as a draw. Although the strip looks flat and both teams’ batting is significantly more talented than their bowling, a few poor decisions, a bit of inexperience in India’s line-up and worry over form in the Australian line-up and we could see a result yet.

Ball Three – With Tendulkar and Vijay pushing their partnership towards 300 and Katich bowling, the match may have reached the point when a bad ball is more likely to take a wicket than a good ball. With batsmen so set, serving up a mix of half-volleys, full tosses and long hops may well be the best option – having faced line and length (well. not from MJ) for hours, something is needed to knock the batsmen out of their rhythm.

Ball Four – With over two hundred overs still left in the match and India behind by 140 or so, MS Dhoni has a decision to make. Does he ask his batsmen to play in an orthodox fashion until Australia’s total is reached some time on the fourth morning and then attack seeking a declaration 150 or so ahead? Or does he simply grind away knowing that a draw would secure the series 1-0? I feel that every match should be played to win and that Australia won’t enjoy batting 150 behind on a fifth day wicket.

Ball Five – One has to feel for Cheteshwar Pujara. He watched for 90 overs with the pads on, before walking out for his debut Test innings. A lovely cover drive brought a boundary, but next ball he got a rare shooter and a less than rare marginal LBW appeal upheld by Billy Bowden. Cricket, even for a man who at 22 has six double centuries and four triples, can be a cruel game.

Ball Six – With India 411-4, Nathan Hauritz has just completed the double of averaging over 100 runs per wicket at an economy rate over 4. Tours of India have broken better bowlers than Hauritz, but it’s hard to believe that the finger spinner, for all of his persistence, is the best option for Australia.

You can find the Tooting Trumpet at Testmatchsofa.com and on Twitter at @garynaylor999 and @Fakeadil.

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Responses

  1. Any batsman must feel dread when he takes his guard, looks down the other end and sees Billy B. Mind you, if Nathan H is standing just behind him, things might begin to look up.

  2. gg – true!

  3. I can handle spin bowlers being pummelled by SRT. It happens. My problem is Hauritz is a bit like Monty Panesar. By that I mean I’ve never seen him use a couple of overs or even a couple of balls to try and work a batsman out of position in order to engineer a wicket.

  4. Andrew McDonald – 163 of 112 balls against WA in the first Shield game of the summer. Maybe at 29 he’s a bit old, not to mention the fact he plays for the wrong state, but the least the selectors could do is use the information to make North feel like his position is under threat so he makes a few more of those rare +20 innings.

    • But to be fair, Jim Davis, it’s only against the basket case Sandgropers. The Warriors have picked up where they left off last season and then some.

      I wouldn’t be surprised to see Mickey Arthur himself opening the batting at some point.

      It does sound like a fantastic innings though.

  5. Khawaja got a few too, as did the young lad Maddinson on debut. Should Hussey be given the revolver and the bottle of brandy?

    • North and Hussey will be sitting like ducks on a rock at 5 and 6 waiting for Swann to pick them off, and he will, nervous left-handers are like catnip to him.

      They’ll both line-up like little lambs for the Ashes… Just watch.

  6. Ball 1. Just another reason why the UDRS should be compulsory when the wealthier nations (India, Australia, England) play each other. That said, using the last 8 days cricket as an example I doubt the results would change but the umpiring would improve, no doubt.

    Ball 2. The bookies reckon a draw! They have a lot more faith in Australia’s batting than I.

    Ball 3. MJ finally got the wicket with a bad ball and Pup picked up another bowling some nude nuts from around the wicket. Spot on Toots.

    Ball 4. Once Sachin reaches the double I expect Dhoni and co. to open the shoulders. The pre-lunch crowd will be in for a session they won’t forget in a hurry.

    Ball 5. Pujara is 22 and has six doubles and four triples! The talk of India’s demise after Sachin, Dravid and VVS retire is somewhat exaggerated.

    Ball 6. History indicates that Australia do not fare well without a legspinner. If Smith is our best prospect he must play.

    Also, MJ’s interview at the end of a hard disappointing day was humble and good-humoured. He may be inconsistent on the pitch but off it he represents his country honourably.

    To end, Test cricket can be hard graft and regardless of the result Australia have had a very tough hit out in preparation for Brisbane next month. It will serve them well in the long run.

    • 1. I’m not so sure UDRS would have made much of a difference. Especially the first test. Most games see the referals used up by the 5th or 6th batsman, let alone when 10 and 11 come out to bat.

      2. It better be a draw, India we 10-1 after day 2 and I decided not to take it.

  7. Toots, what a truly beautiful picture of the young Sachin. And it’s taken me a nights sleep to be able to appreciate it, as you will understand.

    Ditto what Nesta said, and on to the day’s play at Bangalore..

    • Pepp – There are some other wonderful pictures of Sachin on the site linked. Amazing how little he has changed.

  8. Well, not quite an afternoon to remember for the Indian fans. I reckon Dhoni is probably somewhat disappointed.

  9. Losing the two openers at this point is pefect. They did well but slowed down when the spinners came on, and Aus needs to push it along. Best to have Ponting and Clarke at the crease now.

  10. Fred – Clarke eh? Still the best player of spin in the Aus XI?

  11. Yeah, well. My previous comment was based on the assumption Clarke would actually play spin well and move us along. He’s not having a happy trip, that’s for sure. Thank God Ponting is playing a few shots, as everyone else is adopting the bunny-in-the-headlights technique, which saw us lose 10 for 100 in the last match.

  12. Exciting! Hope Ponting goes on to score the century that he richly deserves – both his fifties in the series so far deserved to be centuries.

    A Ponting century will also ensure Australia wins. THe first innings showed how thin Indian batting is. It took a SRT to stand between Aus and huge first inns lead. Vijay was lucky to get that decision at 77, otherwise it would have been worse for India.

    I think if Australia can blast to 250+ lead by end of day, they can declare quickly tomorrow morning and go for the kill.

    My indian fanatic friends are glum now. Perhaps, they sense that defeat is looming.

    Finally, after six years of supporting Oz, a day to shut up my friends yay!
    (Ofcourse, Sydney 2008 wsnt fully satisfying – while Harbhajan escaped deserved punishment, was not very happy with Ponting’s and Symonds’ and Hayden’s behaviour either so couldnt really celebrate as much as I would now if Oz won)

  13. Your Indian friends are too pessimistic Kaminey! India has every chance here.
    North of course got his periodical ton in the previous innings, so its back to single digits for a while now.

  14. Felt for Punter, deserved a ton on this tour. Admirable tour (with the bat) from the skipper.

    • Where would they be without him?

      • South


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